APPA News

By Paul Ciampoli
APPA News Director
Posted January 18, 2018

Protecting federal ownership of the federal power marketing administrations is a “big deal” and is one of several American Public Power Association congressional priorities for 2018, Sue Kelly, president and CEO of the Association, said on Jan. 18 at an event in Washington, D.C.

By Elise Caplan
APPA
Posted January 18, 2018

Every home, store, factory, office building, and hospital pays a regular bill for electricity. The cost of electricity that appears on the bill depends on a complex set of variables that are different across the country.

Electricity rates are set at a level to recover the utilities’ costs, including the cost to purchase or generate the electricity, the cost of delivering the power, and administrative costs.

By Meena Dayak
APPA
Posted January 18, 2018

Public power keeps the rates low and the lights on, right? Like your counterparts, perhaps you, too, have gone years without a rate increase. But that does not mean you don’t talk about rates at all. Consider what other utilities like yours are doing to underscore that public power costs less.

By Michael Hyland
APPA
Posted January 18, 2018

Over the past few decades, many technologies have made strides in reducing the amount of energy used when in standby mode. Standby power is electricity used by appliances and equipment while they are switched off or not performing their primary function. Also called vampire or phantom load, this seemingly minor issue has accounted for as much as 10 percent of residential energy use. The culprits include electronics such as televisions, video game consoles, and computers, and appliances such as clothes washers and dryers.

By John Egan
APPA
Posted January 18, 2018

Dollars are not the most important factor driving success in utility rebates. The size of a rebate is not a trivial matter, but it is not, by itself, enough to overcome complex rebate programs or lack of market demand. Other factors, such as program simplicity, customer knowledge, and contractor channels, can be just as critical in successful rebate programs.

By Paul Ciampoli
APPA News Director
Posted January 18, 2018

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s decision to scrap a proceeding it initiated in order to address a proposed rule on grid reliability and resilience pricing submitted by Secretary of Energy Rick Perry is an example of the federal agency demonstrating its independence, with a fact-based approach to the issues and the law, two FERC commissioners said on Jan. 16.

By Paul Zummo
APPA
Posted January 18, 2018

How much a person pays for electricity depends on a variety of factors — including where they live and who they get their power from. This map shows the average revenue from bundled sales per kilowatt-hour for residential, commercial, and industrial customers served by public power, cooperative, and investor-owned utilities in 2016.

Nationwide, the average residential customer served by public power pays 11.55 cents per kWh, compared to 11.62 cents for co-ops, and 12.83 cents for customers served by IOUs.

Take a look to see how your state compares.

By Susan Partain
APPA
Posted January 16, 2018

As people set resolutions for the new year, they’re wondering how to make new routines stick. Those of us who have resolved to eat healthier or exercise more know that keeping these resolutions can be difficult. Behavior change is not easy.

By Paul Ciampoli
APPA News Director
Posted January 12, 2018

Nebraska Public Power District on Jan. 8 unveiled details of a pilot program under which owners of electric vehicles will receive a $200 incentive if they install a charging station at their home.

By Jessica Porter
APPA
Posted January 12, 2018

More than 40 million people in the United States — 12.7 percent — live in poverty, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s report, 2016 Income and Poverty in the United States. Living beneath the poverty line means a two-parent family with two children earns less than $16,543 a year. That means many U.S. families are often faced with choosing which necessities to pay for at any given time: food, medications, or electricity.